Escarpment PROBUS Club Of Milton

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IN-PERSON EVENT ATTENDANCE RULES

As you are aware, our club has a policy regarding COVID. The following must be adhered to when attending an in-person PROBUS Meeting, Social Club, Social, or Activity event.

  • You must be fully vaccinated - you will need to have previously shown proof of identity and your QR code vaccination certificate or be prepared to show it at the event
  • You must have accepted our Waiver Form on your profile page and have sent a signed copy of the Waiver Form to our Membership Chair
  • On the day of the event, you have answered NO to all screening questions.

Let’s continue to practice social distancing and keep us safe and healthy!

MEETINGS

We meet the third Wednesday of each month at 9:30 at the Connect Centre, 121 Chisholm Drive, Milton, Ontario. We have a 30 minute meeting, followed by a 20 minute social break (Zoom members are invited to chat in breakout rooms), after which we have a speaker. Meetings usually finish by 11:30am. Members can invited to join the Lunch Bunch at a local restaurant.

Please note: We are  currently holding hybrid meetings where members have the choice to meet in the hall (no maximum) or on zoom.

CONNECT CENTRE
121 Chisholm Drive, Milton, ON  L9T 4A6

Upcoming Meetings

    • Wed, October 19, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
    • Connect Centre/Zoom
    Register

    We will be celebrating PROBUS month with cake and coffee.

    Lunch Bunch: Montana's

    Toronto Memory Program

    Dr. Sharon Cohen is a behavioural neurologist known for her excellence in patient care, teaching, and clinical research. She completed her neurology residency and behavioural neurology fellowship at the University of Toronto. She is the medical director and site principal investigator of Toronto Memory Program, a community-based medical facility which she established in 1996 for the purpose of enhancing diagnosis, medical care, and therapeutic options for individuals with, or at risk for, Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. Her memory clinic and research site are among the most active in Canada.

    Dr. Cohen has over 28 years of experience in clinical research and has been a site PI for over 180 pharmacological trials. In addition to her focus on Alzheimer’s disease, she has also participated in pharmacological trials for acute stroke, fronto-temporal dementia, Parkinson’s disease dementia, Lewy body disease, Huntington’s disease, and vascular dementia. Her research site has been credited as a “go to” centre for Alzheimer’s trials and has been awarded for superior performance and quality in clinical research.

    Dr. Cohen represents Canada on international advisory boards and steering committees and is a consultant to a wide range of stakeholders in dementia, including government organizations and patient advocacy groups.  She is a frequent lecturer and contributes to media events including those on medical ethics. She is known for her advocacy of individuals with neurodegenerative diseases.

    Despite holding academic and hospital appointments, Dr. Cohen chooses to practice in the community, in keeping with her belief that dementia care and clinical research are best offered in the real world setting.
    • Wed, November 16, 2022
    • 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
    • Connect Centre/Zoom
    Register

    Lunch Bunch: TBD

    Battle of the Atlantic

    In the 20th century’s greatest war, one battlefield held the key to victory or defeat – the North Atlantic. It took 2,074 days and nights to determine its outcome, but the Battle of the Atlantic proved the turning point of the Second World War.

    For five and a half years, German surface warships and submarines attempted to destroy Allied transatlantic convoys, mostly escorted by Royal Canadian Navy destroyers and corvettes, as well as aircraft of the Royal Canadian Air Force. Throwing deadly U-boat ‘wolf packs’ in the paths of Merchant Navy convoys, the German Kriegsmarine nearly strangled this vital life-line to a beleaguered Great Britain.

    In 1939, Canada’s navy went to war with exactly 13 warships and about 3,500 sailors. During the desperate Atlantic crossings, the RCN grew to 400 fighting ships and over 100,000 men and women in uniform. By V-E Day in 1945, it had become the 4th largest navy in the world. The Battle of the Atlantic proved to be Canada’s longest continuous military engagement of the war. The story of Canada’s naval awakening in the bloody battle to get convoys to Britain, is a Canadian wartime saga for the ages.


© 2022 by Escarpment PROBUS Club of Milton Ontario
escarpmentprobus@gmail.com


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